Monday, March 25, 2019

Members in the News: Dorfman, Barnett, Sharma, Hurt, Featherstone, Guan, and Kumar

Jeffrey Dorfman, University of Georgia
Democrats Can Choose Pro-Growth Economic Policy Or Anti-Growth Redistribution
Written by Jeffrey Dorfman: Forbes - March 20, 2019
In an election cycle virtually guaranteed to feature a record high number of Democrat presidential candidates, those candidates have two options: appeal to voters with ideas designed to make the nation better off in aggregate or appeal to our baser instincts and promise free stuff paid for with money confiscated from the “wealthy,” meaning those people with more money than the voters at which the appeals are aimed. From the early pronouncements of the candidates so far, it appears that some candidates will take the first road, while many will take the second.
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Read more on: Forbes

Barry Barnett, University of Kentucky
Ohio Valley Farmers, Electric Cooperatives Push Back On Trump’s Budget Cut Proposals
By: WKMS-FM - March 15, 2019
University of Kentucky Department of Agricultural Economics Dean Barry Barnett said the cut in crop insurance subsidies is surprising to him given Trump’s vocal support for farmers, but it isn’t anything new.
“This really isn’t a partisan thing,” Barnett said. “It’s really been more of a situation where administrations have been proposing these budget cuts for several years now, and Congressional appropriators have refused to go along with those proposed cuts.”
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Read more on: WKMS-FM

Sankalp Sharma, Kent State University at Tuscarawas
Christopher Hurt, Purdue University
Distress Grows For Ohio Valley Farmers As Trade Deals Stall
By: WFPL - March 18, 2019
“If you look at all the large farmers, these guys have the storage facilities to wait out bad prices,” Kent State University-Tuscarawas Agribusiness Professor Sankalp Sharma said. “For a lot of these small guys…they couldn’t actually store their commodity, they still had to deal with those lower prices.”
Sharma and others [Chris Hurt quoted in the article] argue grain prices have been low for five years because farmers are overproducing, and tariffs are only making the situation worse.
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Read more on: WFPL

Allen Featherstone, Kansas State University
The Agricultural Struggle
By: KWIT-FM - March 19, 2019
Tariffs have been making it difficult for farmers to pay off loans. To learn more about how higher tariffs are affecting farms, we spoke with Allen Featherstone.
Allen Featherstone is the head of Department of Agricultural Economics at Kansas State University. He says for over a year the farm economy has been struggling. Some of the struggles include increase in collateral, negative incomes, and the buildup of farm incomes over the years.
(Continued...)
Listen on: KWIT-FM
American farmers confront a mental health crisis
By: Waco Tribune-Herald - March 20, 2019
“The peak of the crisis was in 1986,” said Allen Featherstone, an agricultural economist at Kansas State University in Manhattan. “It is the worst since then by far.”
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Read more on: Waco Tribune-Herald

Zhengfei Guan, University of Florida
Florida strawberry farmers say U.S.-Mexico deal may be a rotten one
By: Florida Politics - March 19, 2019
“The split of interest groups and the level of tension between the Northwest and Southeast are staggering, at a dangerous level,” Zhengfei Guan, Assistant Professor at the Gulf Coast Research and Education Center and University of Florida’s Food and Resource Economics Department, wrote in an email. “The government should take the situation seriously and work out a solution acceptable to all involved, either inside or outside the USMCA trade deal.”
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Read more on: Florida Politics

Anjani Kumar, International Food Policy Research Institute
Access to formal credit increases income of farmers
By: The Hindu BusinessLine - March 10, 2019
Besides, access to institutional credit increases the per capita monthly consumption expenditure (MCE) by 10 per cent compared to those without formal credit facility. The per capita MCE is a proxy for household income and, therefore, an increase in household expenditure reflects a decline in poverty, said Anjani Kumar, Research Fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), New Delhi Office.
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Read more on: The Hindu BusinessLine

See other Member in the News items
Know another AAEA Member who has made statewide, national, or international news?
Send a link of the article to Sinais Alvarado at
salvarado@aaea.org
What research and topics are you working on? Want to be an expert source for journalists working on a story? Contact Allison Scheetz at ascheetz@aaea.org.
*Articles in response to the AAEA Communicating Out Strategy Press Releases highlighting: Government Relations, American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Applied Economic Perspectives & Policy, Choices Magazine, General Media, and/or 2018 AAEA Annual Meeting in Washington D.C.

Monday, March 18, 2019

Members in the News: Coble, Shoemaker, Karali, Isengildina-Massa, Tack, Johansson, Mintert, Langemeier, Chepeliev, Tyner, Gundersen, Hendricks, Zhang, and Smith

Keith Coble, Mississippi State University
Robbin Shoemaker, National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Gro Intelligence looks to reap rewards from crop data
By: Financial Times - March 14, 2019
For Keith Coble, professor of agricultural economics at Mississippi State University, the question of how big data affects small stakeholders is one he struggles with. “In some instances the economies of scale here are such that you’re not going to be able to use this technology unless you have a high-tech office,” he says. He adds, however, that big data could help create better insurance products for small farms in a development context. “In some sense you will see the larger producer being the one to benefit the most, but I don’t think every aspect of this will benefit the large farmers only,” says Coble.
Other key questions are how private data are curated, their reliability and their statistical veracity, says Robbin Shoemaker, national program leader for the Division of Agricultural Systems at the USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture. “Data from private sources can be packaged and sold without any understanding of the quality of it. There could be big issues there when it comes to determining actuarially sound premiums for insurance,” he says.
(Continued...)
Read more on: Financial Times

Berna Karali, University of Georgia
Olga Isengildina-Massa, Virginia Tech University
Jesse Tack, Kansas State University
Robert Johansson, USDA-Office of the Chief Economist
New crop data providers cash in on US shutdown
By: Financial Times - March 7, 2019
The paper, whose lead author is Berna Karali of the University of Georgia, finds that USDA reports have not lost their ability to surprise markets. In fact, the surprises seem to be increasing from data on corn stocks and winter wheat production. “Competition from alternative data sources has not reduced the news component of USDA crop reports,” the study found.
Another new paper led by Olga Isengildina-Massa of Virginia Tech University ran statistical tests and concluded that public information was becoming more valuable, not less, in crop markets.
“The current (government) approach is costly but reliable, while the new approach is cheap but potentially unreliable,” Jesse Tack, the lead author, said in an interview printed on the Kansas State University website.
Two of the three papers had USDA chief economist Robert Johansson as a co-author. Mr Johansson acknowledges that alternative data providers “may nail it better than we do” for any given crop, season or region.
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Read more on: Financial Times

James Mintert, Purdue University
Michael Langemeier, Purdue University
TippecaNews: Farmers' sentiments for 2019 weaken around market uncertainty, Ag Economy Barometer says
By: Journal & Courier - March 8, 2019
James Mintert, the Ag Economy Barometer’s principal investigator and director of Purdue University’s Center for Commercial Agriculture, said January saw a significant boost in optimism among agricultural producers after the announcement of the second round of Market Facilitation Program payments, but it appears the positive impact eroded quickly.
Michael Langemeier, associate director of the Center for Commercial Agriculture and professor in the department of agricultural economics, said the decisions to halt the purchases of machinery or additional agricultural structures creates a strain on agribusiness.
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Read more on: Journal & Courier

Maksym Chepeliev, Purdue University
Wallace E. Tyner, Purdue University
Farmers need USMCA to preserve and build upon a successful trading relationship
By: The Hill - March 15, 2019
The president has threatened to withdraw from NAFTA if Congress does not approve USMCA. We take this threat seriously and recognize that without USMCA, American agriculture and rural communities would be devastated. A Purdue University and Farm Foundation study found that this action would amount to a $9.4 billion loss in agricultural exports annually.
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Read more on: The Hill

Craig Gundersen, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Food stamp changes would mainly hurt those living in extreme poverty, study finds
By: KVOA Tucson News - March 14, 2019
Craig Gundersen, an agricultural and consumer economics professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign who has studied the program for more than two decades, maintains that using SNAP to compel people to work is fundamentally opposed to the mission of the program, which is to help feed the 12 percent of American households that the USDA says face food insecurity.
Gundersen said that it’s incorrect to think that these SNAP recipients are taking advantage of the system.
“It’s not like you have people who are college educated who previously had good jobs and are deciding to go on these programs,” Gundersen said. “These individuals are facing a lot of other issues, and a lot of these people could be considered disabled.”
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Read more on: KVOA Tucson News

Nathan Hendricks, Kansas State University
Report: Feds’ Biofuel Policy produced unintended environmental consequences
By: The Orange Leader - March 10, 2019
Producing a single gallon of ethanol can require up to two thousand gallons of water. Nathan Hendricks, associate professor of agricultural economics with Kansas State University, says federal policies promoting biofuel production led to higher prices for corn, soybeans and other crops.
“Changes in market prices change the incentive for farmers,” says Hendricks. “There’s going to be more planting of corn on existing cropland, and there’s going to be an incentive to bring non-crop land into crop production.”
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Read more on: The Orange Leader

Wendong Zhang, Iowa State University
Land Trends and Values Survey shows decrease in cropland prices in Iowa
By: Ames Tribune - March 14, 2019
One of the positive aspects, though, is that a lower amount of land is available, which can drive up the price of the few plots that are available, said Wendong Zhang, an Iowa State University economics professor.
“They pay higher because there are only a few parcels for them to choose from,” Zhang said.
He said that a few years ago, people who were looking to buy land “could find five or six plots to potentially buy, but now it’s about two to three,” which makes people have to “bid up for the available parcels.”
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Read more on: Ames Tribune

Nathan Hendricks, Kansas State University
Aaron Smith, University of California, Davis
New research finds LCFS bad for environment
By: The Lens - March 12, 2019
“These changes have implications for greenhouse gas emissions, habitat, and water resources,” study coauthor Nathan Hendricks said in a statement. He is an associate professor of agricultural economics at Kansas State University.
“There is no dispute that U.S. biofuels policy is driving environmental harm,” study coauthor Aaron Smith said in statement. Smith is a professor of agricultural and resource economics at the University of California, Davis.
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Read more on: The Lens

See other Member in the News items
Know another AAEA Member who has made statewide, national, or international news?
Send a link of the article to Sinais Alvarado at
salvarado@aaea.org
What research and topics are you working on? Want to be an expert source for journalists working on a story? Contact Allison Scheetz at ascheetz@aaea.org.
*Articles in response to the AAEA Communicating Out Strategy Press Releases highlighting: Government Relations, American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Applied Economic Perspectives & Policy, Choices Magazine, General Media, and/or 2018 AAEA Annual Meeting in Washington D.C.

Thursday, March 14, 2019

JNRPR Special Issue: Institutional Entropy: Causes, Consequences, and Corrective Measures

Call for Papers

Recent years have witnessed a significant increase in the decline and fall of natural resources (e.g., water, energy, forestry, minerals, fisheries) institutions, in the US and globally, due to the corrosive impact of institutional entropy. The purpose of this special issue is to examine in detail the causes and consequences of institutional entropy and also suggest possible corrective measures.

Gopalakrishnan (2005) defines institutional entropy as “the progressive decrease in effectiveness and efficiency (of the institutions) in performing the goals and objectives as originally envisioned and set-forth.” He goes on to point out that the intrusion of entropy “causes disarray in the inner workings of the affected institutions and, thus, renders them diminished in their ability to perform at peak efficiency.”

Entropy, slowly but surely, penetrates, corrodes, and compromises the efficiency and effectiveness of institutions and renders them dysfunctional, over a period of time. Gopalakrishnan, in his research-in-progress (2018-), has identified the key elements of institutional efficiency and effectiveness. These include: 1) institutional resilience or adaptability, 2) institutional robustness or diminished vulnerability, 3) institutional autonomy, 4) institutional relevance, 5) institutional accountability, 6) institutional risk-taking, and 7) institutional innovation.

Institutions, that fail to keep up with social, economic, technological, environmental, political, and cultural changes that inevitably accompany the passage of time, render themselves severely vulnerable to entropy. Depending on the intensity of entropy, several of the key attributes of institutional efficiency and effectiveness, noted above, are compromised and institutional sustainability is imperiled with the passage of time.

The objective of this special issue is to shed light on the process and progression of institutional entropy. We are seeking original contributions that will clarify and illuminate all aspects of institutional entropy, using historical surveys, institutional analysis, econometric investigations, empirical reviews, and more. Policy-rich, cross-disciplinary, and transnational papers, including case studies, are welcome.

Submit your paper online

Please prepare your paper in accordance with the guidelines posted at http://www.editorialmanager.com/jnrpr under “Instructions for Authors.” Inquiries may be directed to the Editor-in-Chief at: jnrpr@press.psu.edu.

Deadline: May 1, 2019

Editor-in-Chief:
Professor (Emeritus) Chennat Gopalakrishnan, University of Hawaii at Manoa, U.S.A.

Guest Editors:
Chennat Gopalakrishnan, University of Hawaii at Manoa, U.S.A.
Laura M. McCann, University of Missouri, U.S.A.
 

Monday, March 11, 2019

Members in the News: Johansson, Joshi, Gilligan, Featherstone, Zhang, Glauber, Smith, Zhang, Langemeier, and Rabinowitz

Robert Johansson, USDA-Office of the Chief Economist
China’s Shopping List in America Has These Farm Goods at the Top
By: Bloomberg - March 6, 2019
Canada may see shipments of rapeseed and wheat shrink, while Australia could find China is less keen to buy its beef and cotton. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Chief Economist Robert Johansson identified livestock products as a key area for potential exports to China. Meanwhile, Australia’s agriculture minister has warned that any deal that’s unfair to other nations could end up at the World Trade Organization.
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Read more on: Bloomberg and Transport Topics News

PK Joshi, International Food Policy Research Institute
Modi's $10.6 Billion Bounty Seen Giving Little Relief to Farmers
By: Bloomberg Quint - February 26, 2019
“Income support is a good beginning and every small and marginal farmer will benefit from this,” said P.K. Joshi, director for South Asia at the Washington-based International Food Policy Research Institute. “They can use money to buy seeds, fertilizers and pesticides.”
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Read more on: Bloomberg Quint

Daniel Gilligan, International Food Policy Research Institute
What happens when you incentivise primary education in Uganda
Written by Daniel Gilligan, Naureen Karachiwalla, Ibrahim Kasirye, Adrienne Lucas and Derek Neal: VoxDev - March 4, 2019
Most low-income countries no longer charge fees for access to primary education, but primary completion rates remain far below one in many countries (Lucas and Mbiti 2014, World Bank 2018). Many schools still lack important instructional resources and educators often work in civil service systems that provide both robust employment protections and weak accountability practices. Teachers are frequently absent from school and are often not fully engaged in teaching when present (Duflo et al. 2018, World Bank 2018).
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Read more on: VoxDev

Allen Featherstone, Kansas State University
Farm loan delinquencies highest in 9 years
By: Lincoln Journal Star - February 28, 2019
"It is beginning to become a serious situation nationwide at least in the grain crops — those that produce corn, soybeans, wheat," said Allen Featherstone, head of the Department of Agricultural Economics at Kansas State University.
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Read more on: Lincoln Journal Star

Wei Zhang, International Food Policy Research Institute
Act fast to halt the declining insect numbers
Written by Wei Zhang: SciDev - March 3, 2019
Researchers, policymakers and donors should act fast to halt the diminishing insect numbers, writes Wei Zhang. Insects are among the most diverse and successful organisms on our planet, and their significant contributions  to vital ecological functions including pollination, pest control and maintenance of wildlife cannot be ignored.
(Continued...)
Read more on: SciDev

Joseph Glauber, International Food Policy Research Institute
Vincent Smith, Montana State University
UPDATE: The agriculture secretary is wrong: There is no looming farm crisis
Written by Joseph Glauber and Vincent Smith: United States Morningstar - February 27, 2019
The plight of American farmers always makes for good copy, even when the facts don't match the rhetoric. And when Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue as well as media reports suggest that farmers are about to face a financial crisis, based on cherry-picked data, farm interest groups rush to Congress to ask for more subsidies, on top of the $20 billion a year already being given to crop growers.
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Read more on: United States Morningstar

Wendong Zhang, Iowa State University
Editorial: Understand these long-term factors shaping China's demand for ag imports
By: Omaha World-Herald - March 2, 2019
The author of the new report is Wendong Zhang, an assistant economics professor at Iowa State University. He is a native of China who writes extensively about China’s agricultural sector. His report outlines a set of key points; here are some examples:
» Agriculture is not China’s “comparative advantage. In other words, other countries that are more efficient or more productive in their agricultural output in general could find significant export opportunities in China, given its 1.3 billion population.
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Read more on: Omaha World-Herald and Soundcloud

Michel Langemeier, Purdue University
Expert talks grain futures during Farmers Breakfast
By: The Tribune - March 7, 2019
Michael Langemeier with Purdue University’s Department of Agricultural Economics said one of first things most economists are taking a close look at now are acreage decisions based on the prices of the two largest crops grown in the Corn Belt.
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Read more on: The Tribune and The Herald

Adam Rabinowitz, University of Georgia
Georgia growers face season of uncertainty
By: Henry Herald - March 3, 2019
“We had the market facilitation program last year to cover some of those losses that were a result of trade and (U.S. Secretary of Agriculture) Sonny Perdue has said he doesn’t want to do that again this year,” said Rabinowitz, an assistant professor with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “If those tariffs do not get removed, then there’s questions on what’s going to happen in terms of prices and indications are there will not be any other type of government support.”
(Continued...)
Read more on: Henry Herald

See other Member in the News items
Know another AAEA Member who has made statewide, national, or international news?
Send a link of the article to Sinais Alvarado at
salvarado@aaea.org
What research and topics are you working on? Want to be an expert source for journalists working on a story? Contact Allison Scheetz at ascheetz@aaea.org.
*Articles in response to the AAEA Communicating Out Strategy Press Releases highlighting: Government Relations, American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Applied Economic Perspectives & Policy, Choices Magazine, General Media, and/or 2018 AAEA Annual Meeting in Washington D.C.

Monday, March 4, 2019

Members in the News: Featherstone, Li, Zhang, Hayes, Zilberman, Glauber, Smith, Chen, Villoria, and Wilson

Allen Featherstone, Kansas State University
Farm loan delinquencies highest in 9 years as prices slump
By: The Washington Post - February 28, 2019
“It is beginning to become a serious situation nationwide at least in the grain crops — those that produce corn, soybeans, wheat,” said Allen Featherstone, head of the Department of Agricultural Economics at Kansas State University.
With today’s low crop prices, it takes high yields to mitigate some of the losses and even a normal harvest or a crop failure could devastate a farm’s bottom line. The high delinquency rates are caused by back-to-back years of low prices, with those producers who are in more financial trouble being ones who also had low yields, Featherstone said.
(Continued...)
Read more on: The Washington Post

Minghao Li, Iowa State University
Wendong Zhang, Iowa State University
Dermot Hayes, Iowa State University
Trump Shouldn’t Settle for a Bowl of Chicken-Rice
By: The Washington Post - February 24, 2019
There are other areas with potential. Removing barriers to U.S. pork could increase China’s imports by a median of $8.9 billion, according to a study last year by Minghao Li, Wendong Zhang, and Dermot Hayes of Iowa State University. The total increase in major agricultural goods could be a median of $35 billion and as much as $53 billion, they argued.
Our estimates don’t even include serious moves to open up trade in China’s most protected crops – corn, wheat and rice. All three operate under tariff rate quota systems, by which paltry amounts are allowed in with a 1 percent tariff but shipments outside of the quota are subject to a punitive 65 percent rate.
(Continued...)
Read more on: The Washington Post

David Zilberman, University of California, Berkeley
No genetic engineering means people die
By: Globes Israel Business Arena - February 18, 2019
Prof. David Zilberman insists that agricultural policy must see the whole picture - he even talks to farmers.
"One day, when my son brought his new date to our home, I heard him tell her, 'I made a salad for you. It's organic!,'" relates Prof. David Zilberman, holder of the Robinson Chair in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of California, Berkeley. "He knows that organic fruits and vegetables don't mean much as long as they are washed, and  sometimes they are less healthy than regular fruits and vegetables. But I understood that what he meant was, 'See how cultured I am, how clean I am, how healthy I am, how rich I am.'"
(Continued...)
Read more on: Globes Israel Business Arena

Joseph Glauber, International Food Policy Research Institute
Vincent Smith, Montana State University
Economists Don't See Farm Crisis
By: Progressive Farmer - February 27, 2019
Joe Glauber, a former USDA chief economist, and Vincent Smith, an economics professor at Montana State University, co-authored an op-ed for Dow Jones news service that challenges the argument that American farmers are facing a crisis. Glauber and Smith are both visiting scholars at the American Enterprise Institute.
In the op-ed piece published Tuesday, Glauber and Smith challenged media portrayals of farmers struggling to make ends meet, stating: "The plight of American farmers always makes for good copy, even when the facts don't match the rhetoric. And when media reports suggest that farmers are about to face a financial crisis, based on one or two pieces of cherry-picked data, farm interest groups rush to Congress to ask for more subsidies, on top of the $20 billion a year already being given to crop growers."
(Continued...)
Read more on: Progressive Farmer and AEI

Bowen Chen, Kansas State University
Nelson Villoria, Kansas State University
Importing maize stabilizes prices at home
By: Physics World - February 19, 2019
“International markets act as a source of stability rather than a source of risk,” says Bowen Chen of Kansas State University, US. “This is at least the case for maize.”
By performing a linear-regression analysis on data taken from 76 maize markets in 27 countries from 2000–2015, Chen and his Kansas colleague Nelson Villoria found that a 1% rise in the import ratio resulted in a 0.29% reduction in an intra-annual coefficient of variability of maize prices. In comparison, a 1% rise in stored maize for future consumption reduced the variability coefficient by 0.22%.
(Continued...)
Read more on: Physics World

William Wilson, North Dakota State University
Experts talk international trade at Northern Corn and Soybean Expo
By: AgWeek - February 17, 2019
Wilson says the agricultural issues are easy, such as getting rid of the tariffs, dealing with China state run grain enterprise (COFCO) and getting China to rebound back to the level of their previous purchases. However, the tough areas are still left to tackle.
"It's a pretty monumental the task to sort of unravel these things like intellectual property and forced technology transfer in 90 days," he says.
(Continued...)
Read more on: AgWeek

See other Member in the News items
Know another AAEA Member who has made statewide, national, or international news?
Send a link of the article to Sinais Alvarado at
salvarado@aaea.org
What research and topics are you working on? Want to be an expert source for journalists working on a story? Contact Allison Scheetz at ascheetz@aaea.org.
*Articles in response to the AAEA Communicating Out Strategy Press Releases highlighting: Government Relations, American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Applied Economic Perspectives & Policy, Choices Magazine, General Media, and/or 2018 AAEA Annual Meeting in Washington D.C.

Friday, March 1, 2019

2019 AAEA Annual Meeting Housing and Registration are OPEN

Atlanta Marriott Marquis
265 Peachtree Center Ave NE
Atlanta, GA 30303

(888) 789-3090
Mention AAEA Annual Meeting

Reserve a room in the AAEA Room Block online
Single/Double $199.00
plus (currently) 16.9% tax and $5.00 GA Hotel Fee
About 1,400 participants are expected to attend the 2019 AAEA Annual Meeting, which will take place on July 21-23 at the Atlanta Marriott Marquis in downtown Atlanta.
Annual Meeting registrants will receive a name badge when they arrive in Atlanta. Attendees will also have access to all of the concurrent sessions, plenary sessions, the Poster Receptions, Welcome Reception on Sunday night, and the Closing Reception on Tuesday night. Tickets for luncheons and Pre-/Post-conference Workshops are not included with the registration cost, but can be purchased separately during registration.

Registration Fees

Join AAEA or renew your membership to get the discounted registration rate by visiting http://www.aaea.org/membership.
Registration Type Early
(Present- May 22)
Advanced
(May 23- July 2)
On-Site
(July 3 and after)
Professional
Member
$435 $510 $585
Professional
Non-member
$585 $660 $735
Senior
Member
$325 $400 $475
Senior
Non-member
$445 $520 $595
Graduate Student
Member
$105 $140 $180
Graduate Student
Non-member
$260 $295 $340
Guest Registration* $60 per guest $60 per guest $60 per guest
*Guest Registration
Attendees are encouraged to bring spouses, friends, and family to the Annual Meeting. All such attendees must register as guests in order to participate in meeting activities, at the cost of $60 per guest. Children under the age of 16 may attend the meeting for free. Guests include any interested party not professionally in the field of agricultural economics or applied economics, or a related discipline. Registered guests will receive a name badge and are invited to attend the Welcome Reception at no additional charge.


Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Webinar: March 2019 Farm Income Forecast

ERS releases farm income statement and balance sheet estimates and forecasts three times a year, in February, August and November.  These core statistical indicators provide guidance to policy makers, lenders, commodity organizations, farmers, and others interested in the financial status of the farm economy. ERS's farm income statistics also inform the computation of agriculture's contribution to the gross domestic product of the U.S. economy.  During this webinar, economist Carrie Litkowski provides the first forecast for 2019. 

March 6, 2019
1:00 pm EST


https://cc.readytalk.com/r/qzohcf1gbnl5&eom