Friday, October 15, 2021

Food for All: International Organizations and the Transformation of Agriculture

By: Uma Lele, Manmohan Agarwal, Brian C. Baldwin, and Sambuddha Goswami

Many developing countries are falling behind sustainable development goals: food and nutrition levels have deteriorated due to conflict, climate change, and the Covid pandemic, while global ambitions for achieving sustainable food security and adequate nutrition have increased. But what are the prospects of achieving sustainable, healthy food for all? What is the best response to concerns about growing differentiation among developing countries in terms of domestic agricultural and industrial performance? How have global institutions, established during the post-World War Two period, helped developing countries to deal with the past economic fallout of food, fuel, and financial crises?

Food for All explores how developments since these organizations were established have led to changes in the provision of international financial and technical assistance in support of the global food and agriculture system and how developing countries' own efforts have helped transform them These developments, and the increase in the number of global actors, have expanded and complicated global governance, presenting both opportunities for as well as challenges to the improvement of food systems. This volume provides an analysis of the structure, coordination, and management of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), and the World Food Programme (WFP). It also looks at the World Bank, the largest international funder of policy advice and investment projects, and CGIAR, a leading funder of international agricultural research.

This is an open access title available under the terms of a CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International licence. It is free to read at Oxford Scholarship Online and offered as a free PDF download from OUP and selected open access locations.

Buy the book: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/food-for-all-9780198755173?cc=us&lang=en&#

 

Monday, October 11, 2021

Member in the News: Devadoss, Lusk, Koontz, Anderson, McKenzie, Zhang, Fischer, Batabyal, Sawadgo, Schroeder, Coffey, Tonsor, Gundersen, et al.

Stephen Devadoss, Texas Tech University

Rising temperatures could make milk more expensive. Experts explain why.

By: USA Today & Detroit Free Press - October 4, 2021

Stephen Devadoss, the Emabeth Thompson endowed professor at Texas Tech University, emphasized that warming temperatures could hit small farms the hardest because of the costs of keeping cows cool with fans and more.

(Continued...)
Read more on: USA Today & Detroit Free Press


Jayson Lusk, Purdue University

The price of meat is going up. Ranchers and corporations are split on why.

By: NBC News - October 2, 2021

Jayson Lusk, the head of the Department of Agricultural Economics at Purdue University, testified before Congress that it should work to anticipate future challenges, rather than address shortages in the system caused by the pandemic. 

(Continued...)
Read more on: NBC News


Stephen Koontz, Colorado State University
Jonathon Anderson, University of Arkansas
Andrew McKenzie, University of Arkansas

Government Interference in Beef & Cattle Markets Has Unintended Consequences

By: AgriMarketing - October 6, 2021

In response to a bipartisan request from the House Agriculture Committee, Texas A&M University has completed a comprehensive report on the U.S. cattle and beef markets written by leading economists across the country. Among its key findings is that proposals increasing government intervention and mandates will cost livestock producers billions of dollars.

(Continued...)
Watch video on: AgriMarketing


Wendong Zhang, Iowa State University

Foreign Hand

By: Earth Island Journal - Autumn 2021

A major trigger for the increase was the 2008 economic recession, when the stock market collapse led foreign entities to seek alternative investments. In farmland, they found a lucrative option, says Wendong Zhang, an economics professor at Iowa State University. Some of the biggest purchasers of land are investment and pension funds, which see farmland as a valuable asset in a larger investment portfolio.

(Continued...)
Read more on: Earth Island Journal


Bart Fischer, Texas A&M University

Ag and Food Policy Center at Texas A&M Releases Book on the Current Cattle Market Challenges

By: Oklahoma Farm Report - October 5, 2021

“This is the product of a collaboration between the AFPC and the Office of the Chief Economist at the USDA,” said Bart Fischer, Ph.D., co-director of AFPC and one of the book’s editors. “The work originated from a request by the bipartisan leadership of the Committee on Agriculture in the U.S. House of Representatives during the 116th Congress.”

(Continued...)
Read more on: Oklahoma Farm Report


Amitrajeet Batabyal, Rochester Institute of Technology

Chinese Communist Party’s succession problem matters

By: Rochester Business Journal - October 5, 2021

It has become fashionable for some scholars of China to claim that the political system in that nation, led by the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), has become institutionalized over time. What this claim means is that there exist rules that govern how leaders are selected and promoted. 

(Continued...)
Read more on: Rochester Business Journal


Wendiam Sawadgo, Auburn University

Consumers see red, meatpackers see green as beef prices surge

By: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution - September 30, 2021

Wendiam Sawadgo, an assistant professor and farm extension economist at Auburn University, said consumers benefit from meatpackers consolidation because it helps keep production costs down.

(Continued...)
Read more on: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution


Ted Schroeder, Kansas State University
Brian Coffey, Kansas State University
Glynn Tonsor, Kansas State University

K-State ag economists evaluate price discovery in cattle markets

By: High Plains Journal - October 3, 2021

Kansas State University agricultural economists say that short-term disruptions in the fed cattle and beef industries have not changed longer-term motivations for how buyers and sellers establish prices for cattle.

(Continued...)
Read more on: High Plains Journal


Craig Gundersen, Auburn University

$1.5 million endowed chair gift brings food economist to Baylor hunger effort

By: Waco-Tribune Herald - October 4, 2021

Economist Craig Gundersen will be the first Jim and Tammy Snee Family Chair in Food Security at Baylor University. Hormel Foods CEO Jim Snee and his wife donated $1.5 million to create the endowed faculty position last month.

(Continued...)
Read more on: Waco-Tribune Herald


Luis Ribera, Texas A&M University

Assessing global market potential for Texas agricultural commodities

By: Lubbock Avalanche-Journal - October 2, 2021

“The U.S. is the largest agricultural exporter in the world, and 95% of the world’s population is outside the U.S., so we are helping feed the world,” said CNAS director Luis Ribera, Ph.D.,  Department of Agricultural Economics in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Bryan-College Station. “Opening new markets and/or expanding our export share in the world is important to U.S. and Texas producers in that about one-third of U.S. farm income comes from exports.”

(Continued...)
Read more on: Lubbock Avalanche-Journal


Jeff Reimer, Oregon State University

Oregon agriculture, fiber and food sector exceeds $42 billion

By: Lebanon Express - October 1, 2021

“The report provides a snapshot of where the Oregon agriculture, food and fiber sector stands,” said Jeff Reimer, a professor of applied economics and one of the authors of the report. “We’re able to do this analysis that shows linkages that wouldn’t be apparent if you were just looking at statistics about the economy.”

(Continued...)
Read more on: Lebanon Express


Bart Fischer, Texas A&M University
Joe Outlaw, Texas A&M University
David Anderson, Texas A&M University

Agricultural and Food Policy Center at Texas A&M leads collaborative effort

By: North Texas e-News - October 6, 2021

In response to a request from Congress and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, USDA, the Agricultural and Food Policy Center, AFPC, at the Department of Agricultural Economics in the Texas A&M College of Agriculture and Life Sciences have completed an extensive report on the U.S. cattle market, including information on supply chain disruptions.

(Continued...)
Read more on: North Texas e-News


Dawn Thilmany, Colorado State University
Alexandria Hill, Colorado University

Area farmers begin harvesting amid price slump

By: La Junta Tribune-Democrat - October 6, 2021

CSU has formed a special labor issues working group, which continues to expand and bring in additional expertise from across multiple academic disciplines, according to Dawn Thilmany, a professor and outreach coordinator in food systems economics.

Small- to medium-sized produce farms and dairies are the two agricultural sectors that are expected to feel the biggest impact from the new labor law, according to Ali Hill, an assistant professor of agricultural and resource economics.

(Continued...)
Read more on: La Junta Tribune-Democrat


 
 

See other Member in the News items

Know another AAEA Member who has made statewide, national, or international news? Send a link of the article to Jessica Weister at jweister@aaea.org.

What research and topics are you working on? Want to be an expert source for journalists working on a story? Contact Allison Ware at aware@aaea.org.

*Disclaimer - This email is to acknowledge citations of current AAEA members and/or their research in any public media channel. AAEA does not agree nor disagree with the views or attitudes of cited outside publications.

Tuesday, October 5, 2021

iSEE Congress Fall 2021 - Circular Food Systems

In the eighth iSEE Congress, we are readdressing the topic of feeding the world. A major challenge for agriculture in the coming decades: providing a secure and safe supply of food, feed, and fuel to an ever-increasing human population using agricultural practices that are ecologically sustainable and adaptable to climate change.

Over a group of one-hour sessions in October and November, “Circular Food Systems” will bring together speakers and panelists from different disciplines to dive deeper into the topic. Our modified “teach-in” event will introduce the Illinois campus and community to cutting-edge thinking from highly influential scholars on advancing sustainability of our agriculture and food systems. Achieving this sustainability while continuing to increase agricultural productivity is a critical national priority. Through this conference, we aim to raise awareness of the national dialogue on sustainable agriculture and pathways for scientists, economists, and policymakers to collaborate in transitioning our agricultural system to one that reduces, reuses, and recycles waste.

In early September, with COVID-19 uncertainties still prevailing, iSEE chose to transform the Congress from in-person to online. Once the sessions have been rescheduled, please click the links within their toggles to register for each of the Zoom webinars!

The iSEE Congress is an assembly of leading national and international scientists, researchers, educators, journalists, and activists who will present the latest scientific research and community action on grand world challenges of sustainability, energy generation and conservation, and the environment.

The Fall 2021 Congress organizing committee includes iSEE Associate Director for Education & Outreach Luis Rodriguez, former iSEE Associate Director for Education & Outreach Gillen D’Arcy Wood, and University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign faculty members Carl Bernacchi, Adjunct Professor of Plant Biology and USDA Agricultural Research Service Plant Physiologist; Emily Heaton, Professor of Regenerative Agriculture in the Department of Crop Sciences; Don Fullerton, Professor of Finance; Andrew Margenot, Assistant Professor of Crop Sciences; and Vijay Singh, Distinguished Professor of Bioprocessing in the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering and Director of the Integrated Bioprocessing Research Laboratory. The Oct. 27 “Transforming Food Systems for a Circular Economy” session is co-sponsored and co-hosted by the Council on Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics (C-FARE) and endorsed by the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association (AAEA).

Monday, October 4, 2021

Members in the News: Holcomb, Lusk, Taylor, Stevens, Jaenicke, Yu, Durand-Morat, Goetz, Offutt, McCluskey, Schnitkey, Paulson, Zulauf, Guan, et al.

Rodney Holcomb, Oklahoma State University
Jayson Lusk, Purdue University

Fall may bring more grocery shortages. Here's what to expect

By: Today & NBC 5 - September 29, 2021

Rodney Holcomb, a food economist at Oklahoma State University, told TODAY in an email that we can expect to see a shortage of canned foods, but that this has to do more with the container than the actual food.

What types of foods could be affected? Jayson L. Lusk, a distinguished professor and head of the department of Agricultural Economics at Purdue University, said anything that's packaged in aluminum — not only canned vegetables and soups, but also drinks, like soda, teas and other beverages.

(Continued...)
Read more on: Today & NBC 5


Mykel Taylor, Auburn University

Farmland Values on a Rocket Ship

By: Successful Farming - September 29, 2021

“These smaller parcels are being bought up by people who want to move out of the bigger cities. That’s a COVID-driven thing,” says Mykel Taylor with the Auburn University Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology in Alabama. “People didn’t spend their money last year during COVID like they had been, and now they are bidding like crazy on these smaller tracts. That’s bringing up some of the values, even as the average acreage (per sale) is down.”

(Continued...)
Read more on: Successful Farming


Andrew Stevens, University of Wisconsin

Why Americans Eat So Much Meat - Cheddar Explains

By: Cheddar via YouTube - September 28, 2021

(Continued...)
Watch video on: Cheddar via YouTube


Danielle Ufer, USDA-Economic Research Service
David Ortega, Michigan State University
Christopher Wolf, Cornell University
Applied Economic Perspective & Policy

Sometimes, more labelling works

By: Hoard's Dairyman - September 30, 2021

The study, which was published in Applied Economic Perspective & Policy, also simulated if that consumer preference resulted in greater market share than products that offered fewer traits than the comprehensive label. Again, the redundant labels proved valuable, as the researchers concluded that it could help organic participants recapture 3% to 7% of the market from products that only offer non-GMO or animal welfare standards.

(Continued...)
Read more on: Hoard's Dairyman


Jayson Lusk, Purdue University

  • Could There Be Food Shortages This Fall? This Is What You Need To Know
    By: What's New 2 Day - October 1, 2021
  • Grocery store prices on the rise, how you can save at the store
    By: Fox 59 - September 28, 2021

Alvaro Durand-Morat, University of Arkansas

UArk Studies Profit Potential of Farming Organic Rice

By: Public News Service - September 24, 2021

Alvaro Durand-Morat, assistant professor of agricultural economics and agribusiness at the university, said only a handful of the 100 organic rice farmers in the country are based in Arkansas. One barrier to entry is the lack of information on how the organic rice market operates.

(Continued...)
Read more on: Public News Service


Stephan Goetz, Pennsylvania State University

Hunger in 2020 Sharply Affected Even Middle-Class Americans

By: Flagler Live - September 25, 2021

Americans in households with annual incomes from $50,000 to $75,000 experienced the sharpest increase in food insufficiency when the COVID-19 pandemic began – meaning that many people in the middle class didn’t have enough to eat at some point within the previous seven days, according to our peer-reviewed study that will soon be published in the Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

(Continued...)
Read more on: Flagler Live


Susan Offutt, DCL Consulting
Jill McCluskey, Washington State University

Researchers Study Womens Impact on Agricultural Economics

By: Capital Press & The Blue Mountain Eagle - September 28, 2021

“We were just thinking about all of the impacts women have made in agricultural economics,” McCluskey said. “I feel like many of them have been unrecognized. We also wanted to point out that adding diversity to the field can make it more creative, more relevant and even more rigorous.”

“The women who joined wanted to study those topics,” Offutt said. “We argue that without the momentum the discipline gained by having a significant number of students that wanted to look at those issues, it would have remained much more narrowly focused, and we think not as relevant to national policy.”

(Continued...)
Read more on: Capital Press & The Blue Mountain Eagle


Gary Schnitkey, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Nick Paulson, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Carl Zulauf, The Ohio State University

Evaluating impact of House Ways & Means tax change proposals

By: Michigan Farm News - September 20, 2021

New details for a potential $3.5 trillion spending and tax package were released by the House Ways & Means Committee on Sept. 13, 2021, including a proposal for funding new policies advanced by Democrats. This package includes proposals for several changes to the tax code intended to generate additional tax revenues.

(Continued...)
Read more on: Michigan Farm News


Zhengfei Guan, University of Florida

Tomato Trade with Mexico Could Cost U.S. Growers

By: Michigan Ag Connection - September 24, 2021

Guan just published a study on the consequences of intensifying Mexican competition for American growers. The market positions of Mexican and domestic tomato industries completely reversed over the past 20 years. Mexico now dominates the U.S. market, with three times more market share than the domestic industry. That change sparked Guan’s interest in pursuing the new study.

(Continued...)
Read more on: Michigan Ag Connection


Kristiana Hansen, University of Wyoming

UW Extension bulletin looks at impacts on Wyoming Colorado River Basin

By: Wyoming Tribune Eagle - September 23, 2021

“For example, if a producer receives compensation for irrigating fewer acres in a DM program, they might buy a new truck and/or hire less help for harvest,” said Hansen, an associate professor in the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. “These impacts are measured in terms of changes in jobs and income that would occur, directly or indirectly, as a result of implementing a DM program.”

(Continued...)
Read more on: Wyoming Tribune Eagle


Larry Van Tassell, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Conservation practices contribute to productivity of state crop harvests

By: The Grand Herald Independent - September 22, 2021

Larry Van Tassell, director of the Center for Agricultural Profitability, attributed the increase in cover crop use, in part, to the rising recognition of their ecological advantages and government incentives for producers.

(Continued...)
Read more on: The Grand Herald Independent


Micah Cameron-Harp, Kansas State University
Nathan Hendricks, Kansas State University

Carbon credits provide opportunity

By: Great Bend Tribune - September 25, 2021

“There are starting to be a few more concrete opportunities for producers to sign up for carbon credits, and especially some opportunities in Kansas right now,” said Micah Cameron-Harp, who is a graduate student in agricultural economics.    

“They’re making corporate pledges to reduce how much they’re emitting,” said KSRE agricultural economist Nathan Hendricks. “They’re going to reduce their emissions, but in order to get to their goals, they’re going to buy some offsets.

(Continued...)
Read more on: Great Bend Tribune


James Mintert, Purdue University
Nathanael Thompson, Purdue University

Area farmers begin harvesting amid price slump

By: Kokomo Tribune - September 28, 2021

James Mintert, director of Purdue University's Center for Commercial Agriculture, said the major reason for the price drop stems from Hurricane Ida, which decimated shipping ports along the Gulf Coast and stopped all exports of crops.

Nathanael Thompson, an associate professor in Purdue's Department of Agricultural Economics, said another good source of income could be selling corn to ethanol plants, which are bidding 30% to 50% higher than last year.

(Continued...)
Read more on: Kokomo Tribune


Josh Maples, Mississippi State University

Webinars to address cattle-raising climate

By: Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette - September 26, 2021

Scheduled topics and speakers for the webinars include:
Tuesday -- RISK MANAGEMENT FOR COW/CALF PRODUCERS
"Using Price Risk Management in Cow/Calf Production" -- Josh Maples, assistant professor, Department of Agricultural Economics, Mississippi State University.

(Continued...)
Read more on: Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette


 
 

See other Member in the News items

Know another AAEA Member who has made statewide, national, or international news? Send a link of the article to Jessica Weister at jweister@aaea.org.

What research and topics are you working on? Want to be an expert source for journalists working on a story? Contact Allison Ware at aware@aaea.org.

*Disclaimer - This email is to acknowledge citations of current AAEA members and/or their research in any public media channel. AAEA does not agree nor disagree with the views or attitudes of cited outside publications.

Monday, September 27, 2021

Members in the News: Cameron-Harp, Hendricks, Bellemare, Rabinowitz, Cryan, AAEA, Mitchell, Awokuse, & Bir

Micah Cameron-Harp, Kansas State University
Nathan Hendricks, Kansas State University

Researchers Study Benefits, Risks of Carbon Credits

By: AgFax - September 20, 2021

“There are starting to be a few more concrete opportunities for producers to sign up for carbon credits, and especially some opportunities in Kansas right now,” said Micah Cameron-Harp, who is a graduate student in agricultural economics.

“They’re making corporate pledges to reduce how much they’re emitting,” said K-State Research and Extension agricultural economist Nathan Hendricks. “They’re going to reduce their emissions, but in order to get to their goals, they’re going to buy some offsets. That’s what’s driving this market; it’s completely voluntary on the part of corporations.”

(Continued...)
Read more on: AgFax


Marc Bellemare, University of Minnesota

Shipping disruptions slow Minnesota crop exports, increase food costs

By: MPR News - September 23, 2021

Consumers should expect to pay more for food, perhaps for several years, while the shipping industry adjusts, said Bellemare, and they should prepare for the possibility that supply chain disruptions caused by the pandemic or extreme weather might become the new normal.

(Continued...)
Read more on: MPR News


Adam Rabinowitz, Auburn University

What Farmers Need To Know About Disaster Assistance

By: Southeast Ag Net Radio Network - September 17, 2021

"The nature of their job means that farmers face inherent risks,” said Adam Rabinowitz, who is also an Auburn University assistant professor of agricultural economics. “There are ways to prepare and a number of government programs to aid recovery.”

(Continued...)
Read more on: Southeast Ag Net Radio Network


Roger Cryan, USDA-AMS-Dairy
Agricultural & Applied Economics Association

Cryan Joining AFBF as Chief Economist

By: Ag Net West, Missouri Ag Connection, Nebraska Ag Connection, Iowa Ag Connection, Illinois Ag Connection, Pennsylvania Ag Connection, North Dakota Ag Connection, AgriMarketing, Feed Stuffs, Agri-Pulse, Rocket News, Kentucky Ag Connection, Indian Ag Connection, Wisconsin Ag Connection, Minnesota Ag Connection, Growing Tennessee, Growing America, Growing Minnesota, Growing Washington, Growing Georgia, Growing Wisconsin, Growing Michigan, Growing Louisiana, Growing Missouri, Growing Alabama, Growing Florida, Growing Iowa, Growing North Carolina, & Growing Mississippi - September 20, 2021

The American Farm Bureau Federation Announced Dr. Roger Cryan will join the organization as chief economist next month. Cryan joins Farm Bureau after serving as director of the Department of Agriculture’s Economics division for the Agricultural Marketing Service for nine years.

Earlier in his career, Dr. Cryan served as an economist for the Federal Milk Market Administrator in Atlanta, Georgia. Farm Bureau says he has earned several awards, including the prestigious Bruce Gardner Memorial Prize for Applied Policy Analysis, presented by the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, for his work developing the dairy payment provisions in the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program in 2020.

(Continued...)
Read more on: Ag Net WestMissouri Ag Connection, Nebraska Ag Connection, Iowa Ag Connection, Illinois Ag Connection, Pennsylvania Ag Connection, North Dakota Ag Connection, AgriMarketing, Feed Stuffs, Agri-Pulse, Rocket News, Kentucky Ag Connection, Indian Ag Connection, Wisconsin Ag Connection, Minnesota Ag Connection, Growing Tennessee, Growing America, Growing Minnesota, Growing Washington, Growing Georgia, Growing Wisconsin, Growing Michigan, Growing Louisiana, Growing Missouri, Growing Alabama, Growing Florida, Growing Iowa, Growing North Carolina, & Growing Mississippi


Paul Mitchell, University of Wisconsin

Proposed Changes To DNR Rule Could Cost Farms Millions In Management Costs, Lower Yields

By: Wisconsin Public Radio - September 22, 2021

Paul Mitchell is a professor of agricultural and applied economics at UW-Madison and is lead author of the report. He said estimating the economic impact to farms was not a simple process for researchers because of the lack of current data on how producers are managing manure and using nitrogen on their fields.

(Continued...)
Read more on: Wisconsin Public Radio


Titus Awokuse, Michigan State University

Climate change soon to hit your morning coffee

By: NNY 360 - September 19, 2021

“U.S. consumers should expect much more expensive and lower-quality coffee because of rising temperatures, extreme rainfalls, and higher frequency of severe droughts,” said Titus O. Awokuse, chairman of the department of agricultural, food and resource economics at Michigan State University.

(Continued...)
Read more on: NNY 360


Courtney Bir, Oklahoma State University

Veterinarians, pet owners struggle with payment plans

By: Muskogee Phoenix & The Shawnee News-Star - September 18, 2021

Customers want more options, said Courtney Bir, an Oklahoma State University Extension specialist and assistant professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics. “We are trying to find a solution to help veterinarians smooth their costs while helping those pet owners avoid price shocks,” Bir said.

(Continued...)
Read more on: Muskogee Phoenix & The Shawnee News-Star


 
 

See other Member in the News items

Know another AAEA Member who has made statewide, national, or international news? Send a link of the article to Jessica Weister at jweister@aaea.org.

What research and topics are you working on? Want to be an expert source for journalists working on a story? Contact Allison Ware at aware@aaea.org.

*Disclaimer - This email is to acknowledge citations of current AAEA members and/or their research in any public media channel. AAEA does not agree nor disagree with the views or attitudes of cited outside publications.

Monday, September 20, 2021

Members in the News: Taylor, Klieger, Frisvold, Ortiz-Bobea, Awokuse, Franken, Zhang, Sheldon, Countryman, Thilmany, Batabyal, Stevens, et al.

Michelle Klieger, Bentley University
George Frisvold, University of Arizona

Could Climate Change Put an End to Arizona’s Alfalfa Heyday?

By: Civil Eats - September 15, 2021

If alfalfa were to go up in price, Klieger sees dairies continuing to buy it because there are few other alternatives for nutritious feed for cows. “Even if we reduce acreage, the same number of people are going to want alfalfa, which is going to drive the price up,” said Klieger. As a result, she foresees that “the price will go up faster than the decline in the amount [of alfalfa].”

Then there’s the challenge of a lifelong cotton and alfalfa farmer scoring contracts growing vegetables and fruit. Grocery stores and wholesale buyers want to make sure a farmer can deliver, said George Frisvold, a professor at the University of Arizona’s department of agriculture and resource economics. Yet it’s hard to demonstrate this if you’re a new to growing a crop.

(Continued...)
Read more on: Civil Eats


Ariel Ortiz-Bobea, Cornell University

Climate change will alter where many crops are grown

By: The Economist - August 28, 2021

It is betting that a warmer climate will steadily increase how much its assets are worth, by enabling farmers in the places where it is investing to grow more valuable crops than they have traditionally selected. It is far from the only business making such wagers. Climate change could make a cornucopia out of land that was once frigid and unproductive. It could also do great harm to regions that feed millions.

(Continued...)
Read more on: The Economist


Titus Awokuse, Michigan State University

If you're a coffee drink, you really need to care about climate change

By: Los Angeles Times - September 14, 2021

“U.S. consumers should expect much more expensive and lower-quality coffee because of rising temperatures, extreme rainfalls, and higher frequency of severe droughts,” said Titus O. Awokuse, chairman of the department of agricultural, food and resource economics at Michigan State University.

(Continued...)
Read more on: Los Angeles Times


Jason Franken, Western Illinois University

U.S. beef cattle: Numbers down, prices up

By: Prairie Farmer - September 14, 2021

Jason Franken, agricultural economist at Western Illinois University, says the U.S. cattle herd appears to be in its second successive year of decline, within what is typically a decade-long cattle inventory cycle consisting of periods of expansion and contractions.

(Continued...)
Read more on: Prairie Farmer


Wendong Zhang, Iowa State University

U.S. production influences global ag practices

By: Iowa Farmer Today - September 4, 2021

That figure comes from Wendong Zhang, a global economics analyst from Iowa State University, and illustrates just how crucial the relationship between U.S. agriculture and other countries is.

(Continued...)
Read more on: Iowa Farmer Today


Ian Sheldon, The Ohio State University

Considering Carbon Markets? Look, But Don't Leap

By: Pennsylvania Ag Connection - September 9, 2021

"Farmers are always looking for ways to diversify their income, and carbon markets are one way of doing that," said Ian Sheldon, a CFAES professor and the Andersons Chair of Agricultural Marketing, Trade, and Policy who will moderate the Sept. 21 discussion. 

(Continued...)
Read more on: Pennsylvania Ag Connection


Amanda Countryman, Colorado State University
Dawn Thilmany, Colorado State University

Farmers hit with most disruptive price hikes, supply shortages in decades as pandemic slowdowns catch up to Colorado

By: The Colorado Sun - September 13, 2021

Chemicals used in pesticide compounds increasingly come from China, said Dawn Thilmany, an agricultural economist at Colorado State University. China, a top market for U.S. agricultural exports, has been locked in a trade war with the U.S. and there are relatively high tariff rates — around 20% — on exports and imports between the countries, said Amanda Countryman, another Colorado State University agricultural economist.

(Continued...)
Read more on: The Colorado Sun


Amitrajeet Batabyal, Rochester Institute of Technology

Air pollution hurts us in ways we typically do not think of

By: Rochester Business Journal - September 13, 2021

Readers will not be surprised to learn that air pollution adversely affects our well-being in a variety of ways. For instance, we have known for quite a while that air pollution causes respiratory illness and cardiovascular disease.

(Continued...)
Read more on: Rochester Business Journal


Andrew Stevens, University of Wisconsin
Choices
Agricultural & Applied Economics Association

Greater Unemployment In Animal Ag

By: The Mid-West Farm Report - September 10, 2021

Rural counties that rely on dairy and animal agriculture saw higher unemployment rates due to COVID-19, according to a recent article published in Choices, the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association’s peer-reviewed journal.

Andrew Stevens, an assistant professor in the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics at UW-Madison, authored the piece with Emeritus Professor Dan Bromley.

(Continued...)
Read more on: The Mid-West Farm Report


Daniel O'Brien, Kansas State University

Stocks-to-use ratio, soil moisture are key factors to watch for forecasting 2022 wheat prices

By: Rural Radio Network - September 8, 2021

The U.S. and world wheat markets are seeing the tightest ending stocks-to-use ratios in nearly a decade — two driving factors behind higher average wheat prices. Kansas producers should keep a close eye on the factors behind these trends as they enter fall planting, according to Daniel O’Brien, K-State extension agricultural economist.

(Continued...)
Read more on: Rural Radio Network


James Mintert, Purdue University

Farmer sentiment improves in August, but inflationary concerns mount

By: WBIW - September 8, 2021

“Although corn, soybean, and wheat prices have declined in recent weeks, farmers have more confidence in their 2021 revenue expectations,” said James Mintert, the barometer’s principal investigator and director of Purdue University’s Center for Commercial Agriculture. “Yield prospects stabilized or improved for many producers in August as some precipitation fell in areas that had been abnormally dry and drought-stricken. That helps explain this month’s improvement in the Farm Financial Performance and Current Conditions indices.”

(Continued...)
Read more on: WBIW


 
 

See other Member in the News items

Know another AAEA Member who has made statewide, national, or international news? Send a link of the article to Jessica Weister at jweister@aaea.org.

What research and topics are you working on? Want to be an expert source for journalists working on a story? Contact Allison Ware at aware@aaea.org.

*Disclaimer - This email is to acknowledge citations of current AAEA members and/or their research in any public media channel. AAEA does not agree nor disagree with the views or attitudes of cited outside publications.

Monday, September 13, 2021

Members in the News: Gundersen, Taylor, Rucker, Liu, Irwin, Khanna, Chen, Zipp, Kolodinsky, MacDonald, Richards, Manfredo, Batabyal, Munisamy, et al.

Craig Gundersen, Baylor University

  • Government and charitable actions likely kept millions of Americans out of food insecurity during the pandemic
    By: The Conversation - September 8, 2021
  • Vast Expansion in Aid Kept Food Insecurity From Growing Last Year
    By: The New York Times - September 8, 2021

Mykel Taylor, Auburn University

Farmers urged to share the wealth with landowners, economist says

By: Successful Farming - September 7, 2021

Just as certain, however, is that grain prices will eventually decline. Farmers who locked in high cash rents during the boom times may be stuck with unprofitable leases when the market does fall. It’s one of the pitfalls of cash rent agreements, says Mykel Taylor, the Alfa Endowed Eminent Scholar in agricultural economics at Auburn University.

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Read more on: Successful Farming


Randy Rucker, Montana State University

Wild Horse Adoption Saves Taxpayer Monday and Reduces Ecosystem Damage

By: Northern Ag Network - August 26, 2021

Record droughts in the West are causing the Biden administration to rapidly round up and move wild horses off public rangelands. Facing an increased risk of death from lack of water and forage, the Bureau of Land Management recently announced it is planning to remove more than 6,000 additional animals from the range by the end of next month and place them in off-range holding facilities. That’s in addition to nearly 1,200 animals that have already been gathered through emergency actions this year.

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Read more on: Northern Ag Network


Yangxuan Liu, University of Georgia

Stay Aware Of Market Risk

By: Cotton Farming - September 1, 2021

Fuel is running out for the continued cotton prices. The weather conditions this year favor U.S. cotton production across the Cotton Belt. We could end up with a higher production level than expected with continuing favorable weather for the rest of the season. Whenever there is an increase in supply, cotton prices tend to trend down.

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Read more on: Cotton Farming


Scott Irwin, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Using Preliminary August FSA Data to Project Final 2021 Planted Acreage for Corn and Soybeans

By: Farms.com - September 3, 2021

Each year the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) provides estimates of planted acreage of corn and soybeans in the U.S. These estimates provide important fundamental information about potential crop size and have important implications for the price of corn and soybeans. As a result, market participants spend considerable effort in forming expectations about the magnitude of these acreage estimates.

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Read more on: Farms.com


Madhu Khanna, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Luoye Chen, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Katherine Zipp, Pennsylvania State University

Marginal Land Available for Bioenergy Crops Scarcer Than Estimated

By: Michigan Ag Connection - September 7, 2021

Land is the planet's limiting resource. We need land for food, biofuel, feed, ecosystem services, and more. But all land is not equal. Concerns about diverting land under food/feed crops to biofuel feedstocks have led to interest in using marginal land to produce these dedicated bioenergy crops for advanced biofuels.

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Read more on: Michigan Ag Connection


Jane Kolodinsky, University of Vermont

Closure of Bakersfield market leaves town with limited food options

By: VT Digger - September 6, 2021

Jane Kolodinsky, an economist and food researcher at the University of Vermont, said many small, rural stores were already hanging on by a thread before the pandemic — and the past year-and-a-half brought challenges that could be insurmountable.

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Read more on: VT Digger


James MacDonald, University of Maryland

Tyson, Perdue Farms Shell Out $36 Million To Settle Antitrust Claims In Oklahoma Lawsuit

By: Harvest Public Media & KOSU - September 1, 2021

The lawsuit also alleges the chicken companies use Agri Stats, a data website, to share compensation data and suppress wages. James MacDonald, a professor of agricultural economics at the University of Maryland, says Agri Stats is often featured in antitrust lawsuits against big meat processing companies. 

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Read more on: Harvest Public Media & KOSU


Timothy Richards, Arizona State University
Mark Manfredo, Arizona State University

ASU Agribusiness Professor Named 2021 Fellow Of The Agricultural And Applied Economics Association

By: Patch - September 7, 2021

Tim Richards, a professor and the Marvin and June Morrison Endowed Chair in the Morrison School of Agribusiness at the W. P. Carey School of Business, was recognized in August as a 2021 Fellow of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association, AAEA's most prestigious honor.

"There are few scholars in agricultural and applied economics today who are as productive, accomplished, well-rounded, respected and liked as Tim Richards," said Mark Manfredo, former chair and professor of agribusiness.

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Read more on: Patch


Amitrajeet Batabyal, Rochester Institute of Technology

Unemployment benefits expired Sunday: Here’s what that means for New Yorkers

By: Rochester First - September 3, 2021

“They’ve managed to prevent very large numbers of Americans at the lower end of the income distribution from becoming absolutely destitute, they’re now able to pay rent, they’re now able to provide some modicum of support not only for themselves, but also their family members,” said Amit Batabyal, a Arthur J. Gosnell Professor of Economics at the Rochester Institute of Technology.

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Read more on: Rochester First


Gopinath Munisamy, University of Georgia

Florida Farmers Still Hurting Even After New Trade Agreement With Mexico, Canada

By: WSFU - September 3, 2021

"To assemble the data and figure out if it is Mexican prices that are making our life hard, or is it retailers choosing Mexican produce over American produce, you know, there are many questions in there," Munisamy says.

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Read more on: WSFU


Rodrick Rejesus, North Carolina State University

Crop insurance disincentive to sustainability efforts

By: KMA Land - August 31, 2021

Crop insurance serves as a disincentive for farmers to adopt climate-change mitigation measures, according to a new study by researchers at North State University. If insurance will compensate for crop losses due to drought or severe weather, a farmer may not want to pay extra for climate-change adaptation efforts, said Rod Rejesus, a professor of agricultural and resource economics at North Carolina State and the study’s corresponding author.

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Read more on: KMA Land


Shuoli Zhao, University of Kentucky
Bhagyashree Katare, Purdue University
Maria Marshall, Purdue University
Corinne Valdivia, University of Missouri

Study finds Americans value more options when it comes to COVID-19 testing

By: WTVQ - September 2, 2021

COVID-19 diagnostic testing is essential to tracking the virus’ spread and helping individuals, families and communities recover from the pandemic, but people have to be willing to take the test.

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Read more on: WTVQ


Richard Sexton, University of California, Davis
Hanbin Lee, University of California, Davis
Daniel Sumner, University of California, Davis

Californians will pay more for pork under Prop. 12

By: Imperial Valley Press & Sierra Sun Times - September 2, 2021

California’s Proposition 12 will soon require farms to add space for certain farm animals, including breeding pigs, or mother sows. As the January 2022 date for full implementation of Prop. 12 approaches, some pundits warn of upcoming bacon shortages and up to 60 percent higher pork prices, while others downplay any negative effects on Californians.

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Read more on: Imperial Valley Press & Sierra Sun Times


Jordan Shockley, University of Kentucky

Some farming practices can qualify for carbon credits

By: The News-Enterprise - September 7, 2021

Jordan Shockley, a University of Kentucky agricultural economist, conducted a study on how much money Kentucky farmers could expect to make from the carbon market. He found that a 100-acre corn and soybean farmer in Hardin County could expect between $6-$21 per acre for no-till and cover crop practices.

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Read more on: The News-Enterprise


 
 

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